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World Water Day – 22 March

What is World Water Day?

World Water Day is part of a global mission to get safer water for all.

It’s a day for people to learn, get involved and take action.

This is the 24th year, and it’s organised by UN Water in collaboration with governments and partners.

The United Nations organisation sets a theme each year.

What is the theme for 2017?

This year World Water Day’s theme is wastewater.

What’s that?

Wastewater is water that has been used.

This includes water from homes, businesses, industries and institutions.

The term covers everything from sewage and bathwater to washing up water.

This year’s campaign, ‘Why waste water?’, is about reducing and reusing wastewater.

How can I waste less water?

UN Water suggests taking these simple steps –

1. Turn off the tap while you’re brushing your teeth

2. Turn off the tap while washing up or scrubbing vegetables.

3. Put rubbish, oils, chemicals and food in the bin, not down the drain. The dirtier your wastewater, the more energy and money it costs to treat it.

4. Collect used water from your kitchen sink or bath and use it to water your plants

5. You cans also collect and use this water to wash your bike or car.

Credit : www.metro.co.uk
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International Women’s Day 2017: Five things you need to know about this year’s celebration

Wednesday 8 March is International Women’s Day, an event held around the world to commemorate the struggle for women’s rights.

Here are five facts about the day:

1. Originally called International Working Women’s Day, it was first celebrated on February 28, 1909, in New York in remembrance of a 1908 strike of the International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union when 15,000 workers, including many immigrants, marched through the city’s lower east side to demand social and political rights.

2. The first modern International Women’s Day was held in 1914, five years after its inception, on March 8. The day was chosen because it was a Sunday, which the majority of women would have off work allowing them to participate in marches and other events, and has been celebrated on that date ever since.

3. The day was declared a national holiday in the Soviet Union in 1917, and was predominantly celebrated by the socialist movement and communist countries until it was adopted by the UN in 1977. Since 1996, the UN has assigned a theme to every IWD. This year’s theme is “Be bold for change”.

4. According to the UN, it is “a day when women are recognised for their achievements without regard to divisions, whether national, ethnic, linguistic, cultural, economic or political. It is an occasion for looking back on past struggles and accomplishments, and more importantly, for looking ahead to the untapped potential and opportunities that await future generations of women.”

5.  The day is now an official holiday in several countries including Afghanistan, Cambodia, Mongolia, Vietnam and Zambia and for women only in countries including China, Madagascar and Nepal.