WhatsApp Image 2017-04-03 at 05.48.18

#GreenFacts – Autism In depth (Signs and Symptoms)

Signs of Autism

Before a child turns three, careful observers can see signs of autism. Some children develop normally until 18-24 months old and then stop or lose skills. Signs of an ASD can include:

  • Repeated motions (rocking or spinning)
  • Avoiding eye contact or physical touch
  • Delays in learning to talk
  • Repeating words or phrases (echolalia)
  • Getting upset by minor changes

It’s important to note that these signs can occur in children without ASDs, too.

 

Early Warning Signs: First Year

Even young infants are very social, so it’s possible to detect signs of autism in how babies interact with their world. At this age, a child with an ASD may:

  • Not turn to a mother’s voice
  • Not respond to his own name
  • Not look people in the eye
  • Have no babbling or pointing by age one
  • Not smile or respond to social cues from others

Babies who do not have autism can have these behaviors, too, but it’s best to contact your doctor right away with any concerns.

Early Warning Signs: Year Two

The signs of autism are more noticeable in a child’s second year. While other children are forming their first words and pointing to things they want, a child with autism remains detached. Signs of autism include:

  • No single words by 16 months
  • No pretend games by 18 months
  • No two-word phrases by age 2
  • Loss of language skills
  • No interest when adults point out objects, such as a plane flying overhead

Other Signs and Symptoms

People with autism sometimes may have physical symptoms, including digestive problems such as constipation and sleep problems. Children may have poor coordination of the large muscles used for running and climbing, or the smaller muscles of the hand. About a third of people with autism also have seizures.

 

WhatsApp Image 2017-04-03 at 05.48.18

#GreenFacts – Autism (Autism Spectrum Disorder)

April is “Autism Awareness Month”  a time to promote awareness, acceptance and attention to those people who are diagnosed as being on the autism spectrum.

Autism is a lifelong developmental disorder that affects the way a person views and interacts with the world around him. Persons with Autism have difficulties in the areas of social interaction, communication and imagination.People with Autism may also experience over or under sensitivity to sounds, touch, taste, smells, light, colors and movement. Due to the nature of the disability, children with Autism benefit greatly from individualized education.

Autism is treatable. Children do not “outgrow” autism, but studies show that early diagnosis and intervention lead to significantly improved outcomes.

Here are some signs to look out for:

  • Lack of or delay in spoken language
  • Repetitive use of language and/or motor mannerisms (e.g., hand-flapping, twirling objects)
  • Little or no eye contact
  • Lack of interest in peer relationships
  • Lack of spontaneous or make-believe play
  • Persistent fixation on parts of objects

Autism is sometimes understood not to be a disability but rather a different ability and this is because of how incredible some of the kids can perform well on the potentials when they get the necessary skills and training.

Various therapies needed for children with Autism includes;

  1. Speech Therapy
  2. Occupational Therapy
  • ABA Therapy (Applied Behavioral Analysis)
  1. Diet Therapy
  2. Sensory Integration Therapy
  3. Music Therapy
  • Play Therapy
  • The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS)
  1. Parent-Mediated Therapy
  2. Social Skills Therapy

Autism Centers in Ghana :

1. Autism Awareness, Care and Training Centre (AACT)

Office Location : 39 Royalt Castle Road, Kokomlemle, Accra-Ghana

Telephone : 0303-224-729 / +233-24-432-5919

 

2. AwaaWaa2

Office Location : 39 Royalt Castle Road, Kokomlemle, Accra-Ghana

Telephone : +233-24-432-5919

 

3.HopeSetters Autism Center

Office Location : Golden Age Youth Training Center, Community 7, Tema. Accra-Ghana.

Telephone : +233-24-217-2405 / +233-20-984-5445

 

4. Multikids Inclusive Academy (MKA)

Office Location : Number M3, Adijringano Rd. East Legon

Telephone: 0202966871

 

 

 

 

 

WhatsApp Image 2017-03-10 at 12.31.59

National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

March 10 is National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, sponsored by the Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Women’s Health. The theme, The Best Defense Is a Good Offense, calls women to take effective steps to protect themselves and others from HIV. This day is an opportunity to join partners across the nation and take action to ensure women have the knowledge and tools needed to prevent HIV.

HIV is often characterized as a disease that overwhelmingly affects gay and bisexual men, subsequently obscuring the significant and unique risks experienced by women. In truth, 27 percent of all new HIV cases are attributed to women, making HIV/AIDS the leading cause of death worldwide for women aged 15-44. Women are subjected to various institutional barriers that escalate the risk of infection and prevent access to treatment.

 On National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, it is imperative that we recognize the threat of HIV facing women of all ages, encourage steps towards ending the epidemic among women, and empower women to affect the global response to HIV.
 Interesting Facts To Know About HIV/AIDS In Relation To Women & Girls
 1. New HIV infections among children in Malawi declined by 67% and by over 50% in Botswana, Ethiopia, Ghana, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa and Zimbabwe. By contrast, Nigeria only achieved a 19% fall and accounted for a quarter of new HIV infections among children in Global Plan priority countries in 2013 (51,000 cases).
2. The Ghana AIDS Commission has revealed that the Greater Accra region still has the highest HIV/AIDS prevalence rate in the country.
3. Ghana’s HIV prevalence rate continues to decline as it currently stands at 1.37 with women making 57 percent and 43 percent made up of men.
4. Among the respondents, 78 percent of men and 52 percent of women had never been tested. A survey conducted among people between 15-49 revealed that overall, one percent of the women reported that they had had two or more partners in the past 12 months, while among the women who had two or more partners in the past 12 months, 11 percent reported using a condom during their last sexual intercourse.

 

 

WhatsApp Image 2017-03-10 at 16.29.34

The Colour Spree – Down Syndrome Awareness

We’re partnering with SOFGhana to help children with intellectual disabilities this year. Our first stop is the Dzorwulu Special School on the 23rd of March. We’re raising funds to purchase art materials for the kids as a way of promoting art education amongst the kids there. To donate towards or volunteer for this event call Awere on – 020 840 0978

#TheColorSpree
#GiveandGrow