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World Malaria Day 2017 : Ending Malaria For Good

When is Malaria Day 2017?

Malaria Day is every year on April 25.

What is the date all about?

World Malaria Day is all about celebrating the successes there have been in the drive to eradicate malaria from the world as well as raising awareness of the disease and its prevention.

What is this year’s theme?

This year the World Health Organisation (WHO) has made ‘ending malaria for good’ its theme for World Malaria Day 2017.

For its theme WHO is demonstration prevention methods including using nets and spraying insecticide indoors.

What is malaria?

Malaria, Life Cycle of the Malaria Parasite

Malaria, Life Cycle of the Malaria Parasite

A tropical disease which is spread by infected female anopheles mosquitoes. It only takes one bite from the insects to get the bug.

Around 400,000 die from the disease every year. Worldwide there are around 212 million cases.

Tackling malaria is improving with a 29% drop in mortality rates between 2010 and 2015 and a 21% global decrease in cases.

What are the symptoms?

They are similar to flu and include a high temperature, sweats and chills, muscle pains and headaches. They usually appear 10-15 days after being bitten.

But depending on the type of parasite you are infected with, it can take a year for symptoms to show.

In tropical regions of the world, such as areas of Africa and Asia, Central and South America as well as parts of the Middle East and Far East.

Malaria caused by the falciparum parasite is the most serious, and can lead to breathing problems, liver failure, coma and eventual death.

Who is most at risk?

In areas with high malaria concentration, pregnant women and children are most at risk of contracting the disease.

In 2015, more than two thirds of deaths (70%) from malaria were of children under the age of five, according to WHO.

How do you prevent it?

Avoid being bitten as much as possible using nets over places of sleep, avoiding areas with lots of mosquitos such as watering holes, using insecticide and bugs spray and taking anti-malarial tablets.

 

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#GreenAtHeart – US Based Ghanaian Producer Nana Kwabena Supports The Fight Against Sickle Cell

US based Ghanaian producer and DJ, Nana Kwabena Tuffour grew up with sickle cell.

Despite having the sickle cell trait, he pushed and attended the University Of Pennsylvania where he studied Biology and Chemistry which were steps to become a medical doctor and research on sickle cell.

“All the things that make us different are actually our superpowers. When you embrace those differences, its when people respond to it.”

For Kwabena, music and sickle cell are connected.

While growing up in the hospital, he created his own music from the beeps and blips just to drown the noises of the those sounds.

“Music has always been part of my life. If didn’t have sickle cell, I wouldn’t have taken it seriously.”

Kwabena realized that the social stigma behind sickle cell is just as pressing as the disease itself.

He set up a foundation called “AllOneBlood”, a non profit organization that spreads awareness which involves composing mini documentaries featuring musicians who are impacted by the disease and raise funds for people living with the disease.

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LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA - JUNE 1, 2012: John Legend visits Los Angeles Childrens Hopsital.

John Legend visits Los Angeles Childrens Hopsital.

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Inesfly/Ahaban GLF CHPS (Community Health Based Planning & Services) Compound Painting Project

Over the weekend Ahaban GLF joined Inestfly Ghana to paint 10 CHPS (Community Health Based Planning & Services) Compounds within the Greater Accra Region. This was to help the health centres have a better pest free living. We visited all 10 CHPS compounds in groups to paint away. The 10 compounds which the project took place were:
1. Ada Adedetsskope(Ada Foah)
2. Ada Madavunu
3. Ga central ( Anyaa)
4. Ga West (Otsrikomfo)
5. Ga south ( Osofo Lamprey Asuom)
6. Kpong Katamanso (Appolonia city)
7. Ningo Prampram (Nyibgenya)
8. Shai Osudoku (Natriku)
9. Tema Metro ( Manyean)
10. Accra Metro ( Apenkwa)

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After a day’s hardwork, all the CHPS Compounds had a new feel and look to serve the community.

Kudos to Inesfly for spearheading the initiative and all Ahaban volunteers that took part in the project.

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#GreenFacts – Autism In depth (Signs and Symptoms)

Signs of Autism

Before a child turns three, careful observers can see signs of autism. Some children develop normally until 18-24 months old and then stop or lose skills. Signs of an ASD can include:

  • Repeated motions (rocking or spinning)
  • Avoiding eye contact or physical touch
  • Delays in learning to talk
  • Repeating words or phrases (echolalia)
  • Getting upset by minor changes

It’s important to note that these signs can occur in children without ASDs, too.

 

Early Warning Signs: First Year

Even young infants are very social, so it’s possible to detect signs of autism in how babies interact with their world. At this age, a child with an ASD may:

  • Not turn to a mother’s voice
  • Not respond to his own name
  • Not look people in the eye
  • Have no babbling or pointing by age one
  • Not smile or respond to social cues from others

Babies who do not have autism can have these behaviors, too, but it’s best to contact your doctor right away with any concerns.

Early Warning Signs: Year Two

The signs of autism are more noticeable in a child’s second year. While other children are forming their first words and pointing to things they want, a child with autism remains detached. Signs of autism include:

  • No single words by 16 months
  • No pretend games by 18 months
  • No two-word phrases by age 2
  • Loss of language skills
  • No interest when adults point out objects, such as a plane flying overhead

Other Signs and Symptoms

People with autism sometimes may have physical symptoms, including digestive problems such as constipation and sleep problems. Children may have poor coordination of the large muscles used for running and climbing, or the smaller muscles of the hand. About a third of people with autism also have seizures.

 

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#GreenFacts – Autism (Autism Spectrum Disorder)

April is “Autism Awareness Month”  a time to promote awareness, acceptance and attention to those people who are diagnosed as being on the autism spectrum.

Autism is a lifelong developmental disorder that affects the way a person views and interacts with the world around him. Persons with Autism have difficulties in the areas of social interaction, communication and imagination.People with Autism may also experience over or under sensitivity to sounds, touch, taste, smells, light, colors and movement. Due to the nature of the disability, children with Autism benefit greatly from individualized education.

Autism is treatable. Children do not “outgrow” autism, but studies show that early diagnosis and intervention lead to significantly improved outcomes.

Here are some signs to look out for:

  • Lack of or delay in spoken language
  • Repetitive use of language and/or motor mannerisms (e.g., hand-flapping, twirling objects)
  • Little or no eye contact
  • Lack of interest in peer relationships
  • Lack of spontaneous or make-believe play
  • Persistent fixation on parts of objects

Autism is sometimes understood not to be a disability but rather a different ability and this is because of how incredible some of the kids can perform well on the potentials when they get the necessary skills and training.

Various therapies needed for children with Autism includes;

  1. Speech Therapy
  2. Occupational Therapy
  • ABA Therapy (Applied Behavioral Analysis)
  1. Diet Therapy
  2. Sensory Integration Therapy
  3. Music Therapy
  • Play Therapy
  • The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS)
  1. Parent-Mediated Therapy
  2. Social Skills Therapy

Autism Centers in Ghana :

1. Autism Awareness, Care and Training Centre (AACT)

Office Location : 39 Royalt Castle Road, Kokomlemle, Accra-Ghana

Telephone : 0303-224-729 / +233-24-432-5919

 

2. AwaaWaa2

Office Location : 39 Royalt Castle Road, Kokomlemle, Accra-Ghana

Telephone : +233-24-432-5919

 

3.HopeSetters Autism Center

Office Location : Golden Age Youth Training Center, Community 7, Tema. Accra-Ghana.

Telephone : +233-24-217-2405 / +233-20-984-5445

 

4. Multikids Inclusive Academy (MKA)

Office Location : Number M3, Adijringano Rd. East Legon

Telephone: 0202966871

 

 

 

 

 

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The Color Spree Journey

These past weeks, Ahaban GLF joined SOF Ghana on their Color Spree Project as the raised awareness on Down Syndrome and Autism.

We visited the Dzorwulu Special School, where we assisted the kids through art and bead making class. With the help of Live FM’s Vanessa Gyan we wrapped it all up with a special treat for the kids.

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We later visited Echoing Hills Village as part of our Autism Awareness Campaign for the month of April. We took the kids through art class in which to bring out their creative skills and later donated some items to them.

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Kudos to SOF Ghana for spearheading the project and big shout outs to  Sincerely Vee, Spoor Life Foundation , Love’s Closet and to our volunteers for the over whelming support.

Join us in October as we move to the Dyslexia Facility in Accra and raise awareness about Dyslexia and make a difference in the lives of the individuals who live with it.